Tag Archives: 24th street

Lisa & Róisín Make it Work as a Work-At-Home-Parent

I put out the call for Work-at-Home-Parents, and seven wonderful people answered! They represent a variety of careers, their children are all different ages, and Thursday’s Round Table is sure to be lively and helpful.

Here is an introduction to our guests, two by two. Info on the free event is below.

Lisa Cassandra

Lisa Cassandra

Lisa Cassandra  is an actor, grant writer/development consultant, and copy editor, as well as an entrepreneur with her own health and wellness business. She also conceived and directed the children’s short documentary film, The Jackson Pollock Project. She does all this as a single mom around a teenage daughter and son. Mostly she’s exhausted.

Roisin Ching

Róisín Ching

Róisín Ching is a Speech Language Pathologist, parent educator, and co-owner of Echo Speech Therapy. She and her 14-month-old son are currently cataloging the hiding places of all the cats on their block.

If you are a work-at-home-parent, considering it, or as an employer want to keep your hiring options open, please join us!

Making Life Work as a Work-at-Home Parent

Thursday, Sept. 25 (1-2:30pm)

At 24th ST Theatre, 1117 W. 24th ST, LA 90007 (corner of Hoover & 24th ST) Map. More Info.

Join the Facebook event for updates.

Email cindy@24thstreet.org to RSVP.

Some Things Change, Some Things Stay the Same

One of my favorite sites reviews one of my favorite plays.

pLAywriting in the city

By Raquel Sanchez
Staff Writer

Walking the Tightrope_3_web

“She looked like an ordinary woman, but inside beat the heart of a tightrope walker.” Imagine you are told your grandmother, whom you love dearly, is gone because she joined the circus to walk the tightrope. What kind of imagery does this concoct? A childlike mind might envision clowns and acrobats, cotton candy, and ice-cream cones or the wonder of that grandmother in a sparkly dress, carrying a pink umbrella while walking a tightrope. How could my grandma pass up on such a grand opportunity? But in the midst of these visions, the following thought might also emerge: How can grandma just leave me behind?

Death is a delicate topic for adults to confront, but how is it shared with children?  When a pet dies, how often have we heard parents tell their children, “Oh Miffy ran away,” or “Goldie left for the pet farm…

View original post 839 more words

English Roots

Since Walking the Tightrope, the next play at 24th ST Theatre, takes place in England, I find myself researching differences in our

cultures. Most of us know the narrative imposed upon America’s Thanksgiving holiday. Growing up in Boston, I visited Plymouth Rock every year on school field trips, and saw that lovely etching of “1620” into the rock. Not that I doubt the upstanding story of breaking bread before betrayal, not at all….

The concept of Thanksgiving traces back to England, as a Protestant response to all the Catholic holidays. (Remember how key the religions are in Shakespeare?) Here is more from wikipedia:

Prayers of thanks and special thanksgiving ceremonies are common among almost all religions after harvests and at other times.[1] The holiday’s history in North America is rooted in English traditions dating from the Protestant Reformation. It also has aspects of a harvest festival, even though the harvest in New England occurs well before the late-November date of the holiday[1][2]

In the English tradition, days of thanksgiving and special thanksgiving religious services became important during the English Reformation in the reign of Henry VIII and in reaction to the large number of religious holidays on the Catholic calendar. Before 1536 there were 95 Church holidays, plus 52 Sundays, when people were required to attend church and forego work and sometimes pay for expensive celebrations. The 1536 reforms reduced the number of Church holidays to 27, but some Puritans, the radical reformers of their age, wished to completely eliminate all Church holidays, including Christmas and Easter. The holidays were to be replaced by specially called Days of Fasting or Days of Thanksgiving, in response to events that the Puritans viewed as acts ofspecial providence. Unexpected disasters or threats of judgement from on high called for Days of Fasting. Special blessings, viewed as coming from God, called for Days of Thanksgiving. For example, Days of Fasting were called on account of drought in 1611, floods in 1613, and plague in 1604 and 1622. Days of Thanksgiving were called following the victory over the Spanish Armadain 1588, and following the deliverance of Queen Anne in 1705. An unusual annual Day of Thanksgiving began in 1606 following the failure of the Gunpowder Plot in 1605, and developed into Guy Fawkes Day.[3]

Do you have any unique Thanksgiving traditions? It’s the one day out of the year that I bake.

apples pre-pie

Remember your 1st time?

24th Street Theatre hired me to handle their Outreach/Marketing for the 15th Anniversary Season, now in full swing.

There are many reasons why this work excites me, not the least of which is the fact that my job is to tell the stories coming out of this amazing theatre every single day.

One highlight, though, is the 1st time campaign. We want people to feel welcome bringing their kids to 24th ST for their first experience of theatre, and so our friends & staff are telling me about their 1st times.

Remember yours? Share it!

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